Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 10/7/2016

Massachusetts is a gold mine of fun and historical things to do— and during all four seasons, from the Berkshires to the arm of Massachusetts. There are things to do for families, couples, large groups, and singles. Let’s take a look at some of the best things to do in Western Massachusetts in the summer.

  1. Outdoor activities in Northern Berkshires, MA
Including whitewater rafting, zip lining, kayaking, fishing, wildlife tours, butterfly conservatory and much more. And check out the scenic railway that runs from North Adams to Adams, MA. Northern Berkshires, MA
  1. Monument Mountain in Great Barrington, MA
Hike this monumental mountain and take in views that may just take your breath away. You’ll see sights of the mountainous Berkshires and the Housatonic River Valley and make sure to explore Squaw Peak.
  1. Yankee Candle Factory in Deerfield, MA
Visit the Yankee Candle Factory and tour/shop the Bavarian village, a Christmas wonderland all year round. After you make it through the village, check out Wax Works where kids and adults can create their own candles. But most of all, take in all the scents that this flagship store has to offer. You will find seasonal scents all year round; their current scenes and you may even be in luck to find your favorite scent that is no longer sold in retail stores.
  1. Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, MA
The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame is a great place to visit on a hot summer day and perfect for kids and adults who love the game of basketball. Tour the museum, attend an event (on select days), and host your child’s birthday party or an event, and much more.
  1. Six Flags New England in Agawam, MA
Once known as Riverside, Six Flags New England is the largest theme park in New England. There are rides and activities for all ages and plenty of food options. If you are looking for a day full of family fun then this is the place to go. So what are you waiting for?





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 6/3/2016

Sunscreen is essential but buying sunscreen can be very confusing. From water resistant sunscreens to SPF to broad spectrum protection, it is hard to know what you need to keep your skin safe this summer. Sunscreens protect you from the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching your skin. There are two types of ultraviolet radiation, UVA and UVB. They both damage your skin and increase your risk of skin cancer. The difference between UVA and UVB Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic (light) spectrum that reaches the earth from the sun. Ultraviolet A (UVA) is the longer wave UV ray that causes lasting skin damage, skin aging, and can cause skin cancer. Ultraviolet B (UVB) is the shorter wave UV ray that causes sunburns, skin damage, and can cause skin cancer. The definition of SPF SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. The SPF number on sunscreen is a measure of a sunscreen's ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. The number of the SPF is how long it will take the sun to redden the skin. For example, SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer than no sunscreen at all– about five hours. What is broad spectrum? Sunscreens that have broad-spectrum protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays. Beginning in December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will implement new rules for "broad-spectrum" products. New sunscreen rules Here are some of the new rules The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued for labels on sunscreen. • Sunscreens may be labeled “broad- spectrum” if they provide protection against both UVA and UVB radiation according to FDA-sanctioned test methods. • Only broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher may state that they protect against skin cancer if used as directed with other sun protection measures. • Broad-spectrum sunscreens with SPFs of 2-14 must display a warning that the product has not been shown to help prevent skin cancer or early skin aging. • The terms “sunblock,” “sweatproof” and “waterproof” are no longer allowed on sunscreen labels. • Sunscreens may claim to be “water-resistant,” but must specify whether they protect the skin for 40 or 80 minutes of swimming or sweating, based on standard testing. Sunscreens that are not water-resistant must instruct consumers to use a water-resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating. • A company cannot claim that its sunscreen products provide sun protection for more than two hours without submitting test results to prove this.      




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