Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/25/2018

Whether you're environmentally conscious or just want to save a few dollars on your utility bills, there are simple ways to do both. One of the first steps to conserving electricity and water is to become more aware of when and how you're using it.

A major challenge for many parents is to get their kids to turn off lights, appliances, and water faucets when they're not using them. With persistence, you can hopefully get them to understand the importance of saving money, controlling costs, and conserving resources.

Dependable Old Appliances Are a Mixed Blessing

Toilets and household appliances can last much longer than their expected life span, but after a certain point, you're getting diminishing returns. If your toilets are more than 25 years old, for example, you're wasting gallons of water with every flush. Inefficient toilets from just a couple generations ago use as much as six gallons of water every time they're flushed. According the Environmental Protection Agency, recent advances in toilet design are now enabling families to use only 1.28 gallons of water per flush while still getting superior performance. In dollars and cents, families that replace old, obsolete toilets with Watersense-certified models can save more than $110 a year (and nearly 13,000 gallons of water). The EPA says utilities may even offer rebates and vouchers that can lower the price of a WaterSense labeled toilet. (As a side note, toilet use in homes accounts for nearly 30 percent of an average family's indoor water consumption.)

If your washing machine was manufactured before 2003, it's another source of wasted water and energy. The newer Energy Star-certified clothes washers can save about $45 a year in utility bills, based on typical usage patterns. They use about 25% less energy and 45% less water than the old, standard models. The EPA also says that if you have a dishwasher made before 1994, it wastes approximately 10 gallons of water per cycle. By switching to an energy-efficient model, an annual savings of $35 a year can be realized by the average family.

There's actually a wide range of Energy Star-certified products available that can save you money on utility costs and help conserve water and electricity. In addition to washers, dryers, and dishwashers, other energy-efficient appliances include dehumidifiers, refrigerators, freezers, air purifiers, water heaters, heating and cooling equipment, computers, televisions, pool pumps, and much more. Energy efficiency -- or a lack, thereof -- is one factor to consider when deciding whether to repair or replace old appliances, HVAC systems, or plumbing fixtures in your home.

Not only will you save money when your home is operating efficiently, but you'll enjoy the satisfaction that comes with minimizing waste and making the most of natural resources.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/20/2016

Ceiling fans are an inexpensive way to help with the heating and cooling of your home. You can find many that cost under $100 and they have little ongoing cost. And for those of you who like DIY projects, this one will take you a couple of hours to upgrade an existing light fixture. While ceiling fans donít drastically lower the temperature in a room, they do help to reduce it slightly as well as produce a light breeze which makes you feel cooler. The result? Less use of the air conditioner that results in 3-8% savings on cooling costs. Remember that in the summer months, your fanís blades should be moving counter clockwise. In the winter months, ceiling fans can take on a whole new role. When you reverse the fanís blades to rotate clockwise, you cause the air to circulate without causing that chilly breeze. This allows for better circulation of the warm air that naturally rises to the ceiling. Itís often best to have the fan speed set to low in the winter to avoid too much air movement and the effects of a breeze. Lastly, and maybe the most important, is the decision on which fan to purchase. There are few things to keep in mind when you are out shopping for a ceiling fan. 1. The size of the room Ė ceiling fans come in all sizes and choosing one that is meant for your homeís room dimension is key. Itís recommended that you choose a 40-42 inch blade span for a room 70-100 sq feet and a 42-48 inch for 100-140 sq feet. A room thatís bigger may need two small fans to be effective. 2. The location of the installation Ė for rooms with lower ceilings, a flush mount ceiling fan will work best, while rooms with high ceilings will need a down rod so that the fan is in the right place. You also want to make sure for areas such as an enclosed porch, that you check out the UL (Underwriters Laboratories) rating to ensure the fan has either a damp or wet rating. 3. Finally, you want to pick a fan that fits your decor and life style. Fans come in all sorts of styles and can have features from various lighting to remote controls. Changing a current light fixture in your home to a ceiling fan can saving you hundreds over the life of the fan. Especially with Energy Star rated ceiling fans available, savings can add up quick.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 1/1/2016

LED light bulbsIt is probable that electric rates will rise soon, again. Letís explore some ways to help lower your utility bill. First, change your light bulbs to LEDs. These bulbs cost a bit more, but in the long run, they will save you money, using less wattage and last a very long time. If you have a lot of lights, you may want to buy these bulbs over time. But read on. If you have light company, such as National Grid, call them and ask for an energy audit of your home. They will send someone out who will do a walk through to determine how your home can be made more energy efficient. Some states, such as Massachusetts, have companies who will replace all your light bulbs with LEDs for no cost. Also, they may offer you a discounted rate to upgrade the insulation in the attic and other energy-sapping places that will save you money in heating and lighting. Check these suggestions outóit will be good for your wallet, as well as saving the environment. Itís the responsible thing to do, and will save you money, overall.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 3/7/2014

Did you know that sealing and insulating your home is one of the most cost-effective ways to make a home more comfortable and energy efficient? It is a project that is also easily done yourself. The heating and cooling of your home accounts for about 50 percent to 70 percent of the energy used. So unless your home was built as an energy-efficient home, adding insulation will probably reduce your utility bills. Even a small amount of insulation-if properly installed-can reduce energy costs dramatically. Energy Star has created a comprehensive do-it-yourself guide to sealing and insulating your home. The guide provides step by step instructions and photos to: 1.Learn how to find and seal hidden attic and basement air leaks 2.Determine if your attic insulation is adequate, and learn how to add more 3.Make sure your improvements are done safely 4.Reduce energy bills and help protect the environment Click here to download the guide. Make sure to check your state and local codes before starting any project and follow all safety precautions.




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Categories: Money Saving Tips