Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 12/15/2017

Pursuing a house can be difficult, regardless of the current housing market's conditions. Thankfully, homebuyers who plan ahead may be better equipped than others to enjoy a quick, seamless and successful homebuying experience.

Ultimately, there are many reasons to prepare for buying a house, and these include:

1. You can determine where you want to live.

A homebuyer who knows where he or she wants to live can tailor a home search accordingly. As a result, this buyer can speed up the process of acquiring his or her dream residence.

When it comes to planning ahead to buy a home, it generally helps to know where you want to go. If you make a checklist of home must-haves and wants, you may be able to hone your home search to specific cities and towns. Then, you can pursue residences in these areas and find your dream house faster than ever before.

2. You can enter the housing market with a budget in hand.

You know that you want to buy a house, but you still have no idea how you will pay for a residence. Fortunately, if you plan ahead for the homebuying journey, you can get your finances in order and enter the real estate market with a budget at your disposal.

Generally, it is a good idea to get pre-approved for a mortgage prior to pursuing a residence. A mortgage provides you with a set limit that you can spend on a house. Thus, a mortgage can help you minimize the risk that you'll spend beyond your means to acquire your dream residence.

Obtaining a mortgage can be quick and easy too. Meet with banks and credit unions, and these financial institutions can teach you about a broad array of mortgage options. Next, you can choose a mortgage and kick off your home search.

3. You can find an expert real estate agent to help you along the homebuying journey.

If you plan to enter the housing market, you may want to hire an expert real estate agent sooner rather than later. With an expert real estate agent at your side, you can streamline the homebuying cycle.

A real estate agent knows exactly what it takes to purchase a superb residence at a price that fits your budget. He or she first will learn about your homebuying goals and provide insights into the local housing market. This housing market professional then can customize a home search to ensure that you can achieve your desired results.

Let's not forget about the comprehensive support that a real estate agent delivers throughout the homebuying journey, either. A real estate agent will set up home showings and offer homebuying recommendations at each stage of the homebuying journey. And if you discover your ideal residence, a real estate agent will help you put together a competitive offer.

There are many great reasons to plan ahead for the homebuying journey. And if you start planning today, you may be able to enjoy a stress-free homebuying experience.




Categories: Buying a Home   buying tips  


Posted by Cove Real Estate on 12/1/2017

One of the first and most important things that you should do when you buy a home is to be sure that you’re on top of your finances. Before you even begin the home search, you’ll need to be sure that you have money in the bank and know your credit score. What you really need is a plan. 


Set Up A Savings Account For Your Future Home


Having a separate account set up just to help you save for your down payment and other home costs can be very helpful. Find a bank with a bit of a higher interest rate. Often, online banks are your best bet. If you’re able, set up automatic transfers from one account to another for a set amount each month. You’ll be saving before you know it! 


Set Goals


If you have no idea of what you want, it will be difficult to understand what you need to do to get there. Typically, it’s a good idea to have 20% of a home’s purchase price saved for your down payment. Putting 20% down also helps you to avoid the additional cost of PMI, also known as private mortgage insurance. Once you have a goal, don’t look at the big picture. Break down your big goal for savings into smaller bits to make it less overwhelming. 


Make Savings Automatic


We’ve already mentioned the idea of setting up an automatic transfer, but you can do even more. When you are gifted money, instead of spending it, put it in your home savings account. If you get a bonus from work, save it. If you get a raise, live off of your previous income and use the additional income for savings. All of these little actions add up fast. When you make savings habit, it’s easier to reach your goals. 


See Where You Can Cut Costs


There’s probably plenty of places that you can cut costs in your budget. Sit down and see how much your expenses actually are compared to how much you actually do spend. Can you opt out of cable TV? Maybe you can reduce the speed of your internet connection, or find a cheaper cell phone plan. If you take a close look at your expenses, there’s probably plenty of ways for you to  cut back and save.


Sell Your Stuff


We’re not talking about selling your essentials, but if you have things around your home that you’re not using, there’s a better use for them. You can probably get some extra cash for these items by selling them. It’s so simple to sell things on the Internet these days that you can make some money and get rid of unwanted things pretty easily.  


Focus

With a bit of focus, hard work and diligence, you can save up enough money for a down payment on a home. Don’t forget to keep all of the other aspects of your financial life in order such as paying your bills on time and not opening new credit accounts. Good luck with your savings goals!





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 11/10/2017

Your thirties are a time of many important financial decisions. Many people are starting families, buying homes, and getting settled into their careers by the time they turn thirty. The following ten years are often marked by salary increases, moving into larger homes, and saving for retirement.

It’s vital to have a solid grasp on personal finance in your thirties, as it is in many ways the foundation of your finances for the decades to come. So, in this article we’re going to give you some advice on buying a home and managing your money in your thirties.

Straighten out your credit

If your twenties were a volatile time of incurring debts from student loans, car loans, and other expenses, then it’s paramount to get your credit in order in your early thirties. Having a high credit score can secure you lower interest rates on a home loan or let you refinance your loans at lower rates.

Start by making sure your bills are on auto-pay, and be sure to settle any older debts from your younger years. You can also use a credit card for recurring expenses, such as gas to get to work or groceries, and then pay them off in full each month. This way, you’ll build credit and avoid accruing  interest at the same time.

Reevaluate your lifestyle and long term goals

A lot can change from the time you turn 25 to the time you turn 35. Your goals might shift from finding a home near the ocean to finding a home near a good school district for your children. You might also have the shocking realization that your children will be heading to college sooner than it might seem, and that you’re still working on paying off your own student debt.

Consider things like the size house you’ll need for your family, where you want to live and whether that involves being close to aging parents, and reallocating money depending on your retirement goals.

Rethink your insurance coverage

Gone are the days when all you needed was a car insurance policy to get by. As you age and your responsibilities grow, you’ll need to think about the future for you and your family. That may include a more comprehensive health insurance plan for your family, a life insurance policy for yourself, or increased covered for home and auto insurance.

Automate the headaches away

With all of these growing responsibilities, it can be easy to get frustrated with the time you’re losing to keeping your finance in order. Fortunately, there are many tools at your disposal in the internet age that will make all of those responsibilities an afterthought.

First, get a budget planning app, like Mint or You Need a Budget (YNAB). Next, set up your bills to auto-pay if you haven’t yet. Then, put reminders in your phone to periodically check your credit score and reassess whether you need to pay for certain monthly services (do you still watch Hulu?). Finally, if you haven’t yet, make sure you have your paychecks direct deposited into the accounts you’d like them to enter so you don’t have to worry about them.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 9/25/2015

Are you looking to buy a bigger home? If you are looking to make the move a jumbo mortgage might be right for you. A jumbo mortgage is a home loan with an amount that exceeds conforming loan limits set by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO) or better known as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Currently, the loan limit is $417,000 in most parts of the United States, but can increase to $625,500 in the higher cost areas. OFHEO sets the conforming loan limit size on an annual basis. Jumbo loans have slightly higher interest rates because they carry more credit risk.




Categories: Buying a Home  


Posted by Cove Real Estate on 9/18/2015

When it comes to figuring out mortgages many people use the phrase, "it's all Greek to me" but figuring out how mortgages work is actually quite simple. First, a mortgage is a loan from a lender to a borrower to buy a piece of real property (a fancy way to say house, land, etc). The interest on the mortgage is the percentage of money the borrower agrees to pay the lender each year, in return for lending the money. Here is where it gets complicated, the lender wants to loan to be affordable for the borrower so they spread the interest out over time. This is called amortization. Amortization is the amount of money that goes toward principal (the amount of the loan) and interest. This amount changes over time because the interest owed is spread over time. There is a booklet put out by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that explains the mortgage and interest process. You can find the booklet here. Now often your payment is more than just the principal and interest. A monthly mortgage payment is often called a PITI payment. No, not pity even though you might need pity when looking at your loan statement. PITI stands for:

Principal -- the loan balance Interest -- interest owed on that balance Real estate Taxes -- taxes assessed by different government agencies to pay for school construction, fire department service, etc.
Property Insurance -- insurance coverage against theft, fire, hurricanes and other disasters
There may also be other fees depending on the kind of mortgage you have. Your monthly payment may also include private mortgage insurance (PMI). Remember there is a lot to know about mortgages beyond the rate so be sure to talk to a mortgage professional to make sure you fully understand your payment options.
 
 




Categories: Buying a Home