Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/29/2015

More and more millennials are getting into the housing market. A survey by homebuilder PulteGroup found that 65% of those who make more than $50,000 a year reported increased interest in buying a home. The recession has forced Generation Y, roughly those age 18 to 34, to delay buying homes. Now millennials are now entering their thirties and the cost of buying a home is now becoming a reality. While student loans and financial resources are keeping some younger people from the housing market many others are realizing that in many cases owning a home is cheaper than renting. The survey also reported that millennials know what they want in a home: 84% listed storage as a priority was ample storage                 76% want space for TV and movie watching                                                                           69% desire an open living/room kitchen layout                                                                             63% look for outdoor living or a deck                                                                                               36% cited the ability to work at home Other recent studies have affirmed the PulteGroup study and have shown that 90% of millennials plan to buy a home someday keeping the dream of homeownership alive.                                                    





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/8/2015

To lock or not to lock that is always the question. If you are shopping for a home loan or refinancing a mortgage, your mortgage lender will require you to lock your rate on the amount borrowed no later than five days prior to closing. Locking a rate guarantees the interest rate for a set period of time. The decision to lock or not is a question of timing your purchase or refinance with the market. Consumers can get in trouble with a rate lock because there is a deadline on when escrow needs to close. Borrowers should comparison shop loans considering the mortgage rate locks vary in time length. If you are unable to meet the deadline the costs can accumulate. Here are some common options: 15-day lock: Is the “lowest-cost rate” available. The loan needs to be approved by underwriting to take advantage of this lock. 30-day lock: This is the fair market rate and is most commonly used for interest rate locking upfront before loan approval. 45-day lock: Used for transactions taking longer, whether the loan is approved or not. 60-day lock: Can be used in circumstances where the loan is prolonged. This option does not usually offer the best interest rate for the consumer. Interest rates can vary by as much as 0.25 percent on the longer rate locks compared against 30-day and 15-day rate locks. The bottom line, the longer the lock, the more risk the lender takes and the slightly more costly the loan.    





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 4/3/2015

Trying to decide what type of mortgage is right for you can be tricky business. So you may be wondering what is an adjustable rate mortgage? An adjustable rate mortgage or ARM, has an interest rate that is linked to an economic index. This means the interest rate, and your payments, adjust up or down as the index changes. There are three things to know about adjustable rate mortgages: index, margin and adjustment period. What is the index? The index is a guide that lenders use to measure interest rate changes. Common indexes used by lenders include the activity of one, three, and five-year Treasury securities. Each adjustable rate mortgage is linked to a specific index. The margin is the lender's cost of doing business plus the profit they will make on the loan. The margin is added to the index rate to determine your total interest rate. The adjustment period is the period between potential interest rate adjustments. For example, you may see a loan described as a 5-1. The first figure (5) refers to the initial period of the loan, or how long the rate will stay the same. The second number (1) is the adjustment period. This is how often adjustments can be made to the rate after the initial period has ended. In this case, one year or annually. An adjustable rate mortgage might be a good choice if you are looking to qualify for a larger loan. The rate of an ARM is typically lower than a fixed rate mortgage. Remember, when the adjustment period is up the rate and payment can increase. Another reason to consider an ARM is if you are planning to sell the home within a few years. If this is the case you may end up selling before the adjustment period is up. Federal law provides that all lenders provide a federal Truth in Lending Disclosure Statement before consummating a consumer credit transaction. This will be given to you in writing. It is designed to help you compare and select a mortgage.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 3/27/2015

Rates are low, prices are right, and now is a perfect time to think about investing in real estate. Many would-be investors think real estate is a way to quick riches. Rapid monetary returns are usually not the case. However, the rewards can be substantial if you are willing be patient, do the necessary homework, and make a few good decisions along the way. Before you start investing in real estate, here are a few things to consider: • Start small: Don't go large on your first investment. Take on a smaller investment first so you have the opportunity to make some mistakes that won't cost you large amounts of money. Investing is a learning process. • Don't overpay: Do your research on your potential investment. Do full a full property evaluation; research the location, have a home inspection, and look into any liens and owed taxes. Always conduct an in-depth property analysis before negotiating any terms. • Consider the margins: Paying the bills on an investment property is different than paying for your personal residence.  When you buy an income property to rent, you're calculating how the income (rent payments) will help pay the mortgage and operating costs. • Know your partners: Having a bad partner could be your biggest downfall. Try to team up with a more seasoned real estate investor to learn the ropes. It is also important to be comfortable with your partner. Like all other businesses, real estate investing, requires a well thought out plan if you want to succeed. Weigh all the risks involved in real estate investing and develop a plan on how you will manage and overcome them before you get started.  





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 3/20/2015

When you are buying a home the costs really add up and you may start thinking about where you can save money. One question that many buyers ask is do I need a home inspection? Most often the answer to the question is yes! A home inspection is an objective examination of the home and its systems. The inspection covers the entire house from the roof to the foundation. A home inspection will cover the home's foundation, basement, structural components, roof, attic, insulation, walls, ceilings, floors windows and doors. It will also examine the heating system, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical systems. Because a home is often the largest single investment you will ever make it is important to know as much as you can about the home before you buy it. A home inspection will help you identify any needed repairs as well as what is needed to regularly maintain the home. The home inspection will help you proceed with the purchase with confidence. When choosing a home inspector cost shouldn't be your first consideration. Look for the inspector's qualifications, experience, training and compliance with state regulations. Remember, that no house is perfect. There are bound to be issues with almost any home use the information to decide if the house is right for you.