Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 4/6/2018

If you’re hoping to buy a house in the near future, you’ll want to focus on saving for a down payment.

Down payments are a way to let a lender know that you are a low-risk investment, and a way to save money on interest over the term of your loan.

If you have your other finances in order--a good credit score and stable income--there’s a good chance that making a 20% or more down payment will land you a low interest rate that can save you thousands while you pay off your loan.

How large should my down payment be?

The larger the down payment you can afford, the more money you’ll likely save in the long run. While there are ways to get a loan with no or very small down payments, these aren’t always ideal.

First, if you put less than 20% down on your home loan, you’ll be required to pay private mortgage insurance, or PMI. These are monthly payments that you make in addition to the interest that is accrued on your loan.

So, if you don’t put any money down on your home, you’ll accrue more interest over your term length and you’ll pay PMI on top of that.

What affects your minimum down payment amount?

Lenders take a number of factors into consideration when determining your risk. If you’re eligible for a first-time home owners loan, a veteran’s loan, or a USDA loan, your loan can be guaranteed by the government. This means you can likely pay a lower down payment while still receiving a reasonable interest rate.

When applying for a mortgage, be sure to reach out to multiple lenders and shop around for the rates that work for you. Many lenders use slightly different criteria to determine your eligibility to pay a lower down payment.

Other things that affect your minimum down payment include:

  • Credit score

  • Location of the home you want to buy

  • Value of the mortgage

Saving for a down payment

You’ll get the most value out of your mortgage if you put more money down. However, if you’re currently living in a high-rent area, it could mean that it’s in your best interest to get out of your apartment and start building equity in the form of homeownership.

If you want to buy a home within the next year or two, there are a few ways you can help increase your savings.

First, determine how much you need to save. Depending on your housing needs and the current market, everyone will have different requirements. Do some home shopping in your area online and look for homes that are within your spending limits. Remember that you shouldn’t spend more than 30% of your monthly income on housing (mortgage, property taxes, etc.)

Next, find out what a 20% down payment on that home would be, adjusting for inflation.

Once you have the amount you need to save, remember to leave yourself enough of an emergency fund in your savings account to last you a month or two.




Tags: mortgage   down payment  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Cove Real Estate on 9/29/2017

As a home seller, you're almost ready to list your home on the real estate market. For instance, you've committed a lot of time and money to complete extensive home repairs, conducted massive amounts of cleaning and even started working with a professional real estate agent. But even after all of your efforts, you still need to complete several last minute tasks to ensure your house is ready for prospective homebuyers to check it out. So what does it take to guarantee your house is ready for a home showing? Here are three last minute tips for home sellers to get a residence prepared for an upcoming showing: 1. Focus on the Flow of Traffic. Is it easy for homebuyers to get around your house? If large, bulky furniture and clutter fill your residence's walking paths, it may be difficult for homebuyers to walk around comfortably. Therefore, you'll want to spend some time investigating the traffic flow in each room of your home and ensure that homebuyers can explore your entire residence quickly and effortlessly. In the hours leading up to a home showing, you can improve the flow of traffic in any room simply by rearranging furniture as needed. Remember, you'll want to give homebuyers plenty of space, and moving furniture to ensure homebuyers can move around with ease is critical. You also can rely on your real estate professional for support in this area, as he or she will be able to provide you with last minute guidance to empower you to maximize the flow of traffic in every room. 2. Hide Your Personal Items. You know the photographs, trophies and other personal belongings that fill various rooms in your home? In order to provide a great first impression of your house, you may want to consider hiding these items before your home showing. The goal of a home showing is to give homebuyers a glimpse into what life would be like if they choose to purchase your residence. And if you keep your personal belongings out of sight, you can empower homebuyers to realize your home's potential and improve your chances of making a distinct first impression on homebuyers, too. Take a few minutes to place personal items in a desk drawer, a box in your attic or basement or other areas where these pieces will be out of sight during a home showing. By doing so, you can help your house create a unique impression, one that may make your home more attractive to prospective homebuyers. 3. Keep Your Home Clean. Ensure you make your bed, clean up your kitchen after breakfast and perform other last minute cleaning tasks to guarantee your home looks pristine. Ideally, any last minute cleaning tasks should only take a few minutes to perform. But ultimately, these efforts can make a world of difference in the eyes of prospective homebuyers. Guarantee your home is ready for an upcoming home showing – utilize the aforementioned tips, and you'll be able to accentuate the positives of your home to homebuyers at any time.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 9/22/2017

Many Americans imagine a specific type of house when they think about the place where they want to spend their adult years, perhaps even raise a family. It could be a one level rancher, a duplex or townhouse or a single home that's built on several acres of open land.

Housing preferences start early and may be hard to change

People even visualize amenities and room types that they want in a house. For some, only an open floor plan is acceptable. Other people prefer a home that has lots of doors. It's the latter multi-door structure that may draw up warm feelings of safety, comfort and care that a person felt when he was a child living at home with his parents in a traditionally structured house.

These warm feelings of safety, comfort and care can be hard to relinquish. They could indicate that housing preferences are formed during childhood. Should this be the case and an adult has yet to work through one or more deep childhood issues, it could be hard for this person to open up to the idea of living in a house that doesn't resemble the house that he grew up in.

But, as with any house, childhood homes had challenges. Parents simply may not have discovered those housing challenges with their children, especially considering that children probably did not have the resources at the time to do anything about the challenges. Lack of knowledge about the challenges could have left some people with the impression that the house they grew up in was a great home when, in fact, it may not have been.

Before you know it, when adults start the house hunting process, they could be fixated on a certain type of house. Living in a certain type of house could be so important to some people that they not only refuse to consider buying a different house, these people could also lose sight of how important neighbors are when it comes to enjoying a home.

Focusing on a house alone could be a backward approach

Focusing on a house alone could create blind spots. For example, while attending open houses or driving by houses with "for sale" signs posted in their front yards, house hunters could ignore the fact that they hear loud music playing the entire hour that they are in the neighborhood.

Other neighborhood happenings that might be in plain sight but get ignored include litter in neighboring yards, tall grass, a vacant building, unleashed pets or a multitude of cars parked in front of one or more neighbors' houses. The parked cars aren't a problem on major holidays. But, let one or more neighbors have cars parked in front of the house year round and it could create limited parking choices, long walks from your vehicle home or that a neighbor is operating a business that encroaches on other neighbors' lives outside her home.

Of all neighbor regrets, the litigious neighbor might top the list. Buy a house in a neighborhood where a neighbor is addicted to dragging people in and out of civil court and the house buy could prove emotionally, psychologically and financially costly. It's this price that can easily trump a house's layout,amenities and structure, even if the house meets childhood and adult living arrangement dreams.

Therefore, it's smart to enter the house buying process with your eyes wide open. Eliminate blind spots and pay attention to what's going on in the neighborhood you're thinking about buying a house in. After all, your future neighbors are going to influence your overall perception of your home.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Cove Real Estate on 9/15/2017

Establishing a homebuying budget can be tough. But for those who want to secure a terrific home at an affordable price, entering the housing market with a budget in hand can make it easy to accelerate the homebuying cycle.

Now, let's take a look at three questions to consider about a homebuying budget.

1. How much money have I saved for a home?

Examine your finances and see how much money is readily available for a home purchase.

Remember, the more money that is at your disposal, the more likely it becomes that you'll be able to secure your dream residence in no time at all.

Although savings are important, it is essential to note that those who have little to no money saved still have plenty of time to get ready for the homebuying journey. And if you start saving a little bit each day, you can move closer to accomplishing your homeownership dreams.

2. Do I need to get a home loan?

In most instances, a homebuyer will need to obtain a home loan so he or she can purchase a residence. Luckily, many lenders are available to help you discover a home loan that matches or surpasses your expectations.

Meet with a variety of lenders in your area – you'll be glad you did. Each lender can provide insights into assorted home loan options, explain how each home loan works and respond to your home loan concerns and questions.

Also, it often helps to get pre-approved for a mortgage. If you have a mortgage available when you enter the real estate market, you'll know exactly how much you can spend on a residence, thereby reducing or eliminating the temptation to overspend on a house.

3. How will my monthly expenses change after I buy a house?

Owning a home is different from renting an apartment. As such, you'll want to account for all potential expenses as you create a homebuying budget.

For example, a homeowner will be responsible for any home cable, internet and phone bills. This property owner also will need to consider any home maintenance costs like those associated with mowing the lawn in summer or removing snow from the driveway in winter.

Crafting a homebuying budget that accounts for your personal finances can be tricky. If you need additional support along the way, lenders may be able to provide expert tips to ensure you can acquire a wonderful house without exceeding your financial limitations.

Lastly, don't forget to reach out to a real estate agent for help along the homebuying journey. A real estate agent is a housing market professional who will go above and beyond the call of duty to assist you in any way possible. From setting up home showings to negotiating with home sellers on your behalf, a real estate agent will make it easy for you to secure a superior home at a budget-friendly price.

Consider the aforementioned homebuying budget questions, and you can speed up the homebuying process.




Tags: budgeting   buyer tips  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Cove Real Estate on 9/8/2017

From clogged toilets to a lack of ample shower time, there’s always an issue of too many people and too little bathrooms in a home. Most people will agree that one bathroom isn’t enough in a home. Yet, while you’re on the hunt for a home, should you decide to just settle for a single bathroom or keep hunting for a house with more bathrooms? There is always the additional option of putting in another bathroom as well, although this can be costly.  


 In today’s fast-paced world, we have new bathroom needs that make us look at properties differently. Different cultures are also accustomed to varying standards of bathrooms and home building, and find it a normalcy to have only one bathroom. Also, once upon a time, it was feasible for everyone to have people take their turn in the bathroom-even in America. As the family unit shifted and everyone in the house became accustomed to living on the same exact schedules, it became more necessary to have an extra bathroom. 


Age Of A Home   


While you can survive with one bathroom, the biggest message one bathroom in a home sends is that it’s an older property. That may be the underlying factor that steers people away from one bathroom homes. Many realtors even warn of the difficulties in selling a one bathroom home. Ultimately, the decision is up to you. There’s some things that you should consider when you’re searching for a home and are concerned about the number of bathrooms.


How Many Bathrooms Will You Actually Use?


If you’re a bachelor, living on your own, you may not need more than one full bathroom in a home. For comfort reasons, you could consider places with an additional half-bath, but it may not be necessary. If you’re planning on co-living with your in-laws or friends, you’ll definitely need to consider your need for multiple private baths high.


Home Value


If you can afford the upfront cost, it could be well worth it to put a second bathroom into a one bathroom home. It will add a lot of value to the home once it is sold again and your family will have more privacy and space. Not to mention that your home will be more attractive to buyers once the time to sell does come. 


A Luxury


Homes with extra bathrooms are truly seen as a luxury. Have you ever seen celebrity homes advertised that have more bathrooms than there are bedrooms? There’s probably little reason for that other than the luxury factor. Ultimately, your home search will be a bit harder when you seek out multiple bathrooms. However, if this will increase you and your family’s comfort, the time spent searching is definitely worth it! When you’re on the house hunt, the number and type of bathrooms are just one of many things that you’ll need to consider.




Categories: Uncategorized