Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 1/15/2016

There comes a time when everyone gets older and decisions need to be made about long-term living options. Making the decision to move a parent into an assisted living facility can be a difficult decision not only for the senior but for the whole family. When is it time to make this decision and how will you know it is the right time? Here are some questions to ask to determine if your parent is ready for assisted living:

  • Is your parent eating properly? Check the refrigerator to see if the food is being eaten.
  • Is your parent steady on their feet? Are they able to easily navigate through the house?
  • Is your parent able to do simple chores like laundry or have you noticed your parent wearing the same clothes when you go to visit?
  • When you look around the house or yard, is it as neat and clean as it used to be?
  • Is your parent on medications and are they able to remember to take them correctly?
  • Is your parent prepared and able to respond appropriately to an emergency?
If you answered yes to even a couple of these questions, your parent may be ready for an assisted living facility. It is a tough decision to move a parent to an assisted living facility. However, as the child of an elderly parent it is your responsibility to ensure they are properly cared for, comfortable, and secure.  





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 10/30/2015

Water damage can ruin a home. Water can be one of the most damaging things to a home and if your home is the victim of water damage you must tackle it right away. Serious health risks can be associated with water damage like mold, mildew, and bacteria growth. If your home has water damage the first thing to do is to get it dry! This may seem obvious, but drying the area out needs to happen as quickly as possible. Not only do you need to dry out the surface or what you can see you have to get deeper. It may seem like your home is dry but damage can happen in walls, wood, carpet and furniture. Insufficient drying can lead to mold and mildew growth, and harmful bacteria. In extreme cases there can be structural damage to the home. The best thing you can do is to call a licensed water damage restoration specialist to evaluate the damage. Professionals have access to the tools and technology to dry out your home and prevent harmful fungi and bacteria from growing. Professionals will typically use dehumidifiers, air purifiers, blowers, fans, and special floor driers and cleaners. If the damage is extreme it may require wall driers, sanitizers, and mold and mildew remediation techniques. In this case call the professionals because it is better safe than sorry.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 7/11/2014

It is the dog days of summer and the heat is on. During the warmer months it is important keep pets healthy and cool. Here are some tips to help keep your four-legged friends safe this summer: 1. Never leave pets alone in your car. Vehicles heat quickly in the sun, and animals left in them can suffer from heat stroke. This can happen in just a matter of minutes and is life threatening. 2. Do not exercise your pets in hot weather. If you want to get some exercise go in the early morning or late evening to prevent overheating. 3. Keep vaccinations up to date. Parvovirus, flourishes in hot weather and can be fatal to dogs. In the warmer weather pets also spend more time outdoors increasing the chances of encounters with wildlife and rabies. 4. Don't forget the heartworm medication. Heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes, but it can be prevented by administering a monthly preventive between June and November. 5. Groom your pets. Daily brushing or combing lets you check for fleas and ticks. 6. Not all dogs can swim. Do not leave your dog unattended near water. Dogs can drown if they fall into water. 7. It is always the right season to spay or neuter your pet.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/30/2014

They get grimy, dirty, smelly and can be some of the dirtiest things in your home. What are they? Your kitchen appliances! But with some everyday household items and a little bit of elbow grease, your kitchen appliances can look and smell like new for many years to come.   To clean your dishwasher: Regularly clean the seams and liner of your dishwasher this will help reduce bacteria buildup and improve its effectiveness. Scour the inside of your dishwasher with a pad dipped in baking soda to remove residue and stains from the interior surface and crevices of your dishwasher. Run a regular cycle of wash with lemonade. The ascorbic acid will help remove any remaining buildup, and leave your dishwasher smelling clean and fresh. To clean your oven/range: Loosen baked-on food inside your oven using a plastic spatula. Use the juice from two squeezed lemons to clean your oven. Place the juice into an oven safe dish, throw in the lemon remains and bake 30 minutes at 250 degrees. Now you have a clean and fresh smelling oven. To clean your refrigerator: Clean your refrigerator monthly. Remove all of the food from your refrigerator and discarding items that are aged or expired. Create a paste from ½ cup of baking soda with 1 tbsp of vinegar. Apply the paste to a soft scouring pad, and scrub. Wipe away any residue with a damp sponge, Vacuum the undercarriage of your fridge. Wipe down the outside with warm water and vinegar. Keep baking soda at the back of fridge to help keep it smelling fresh. There is no need for fancy cleaning products the things you have around the house will do just fine.  Do you have any other tips for keeping your kitchen spic and span?





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/2/2014

House plants can significantly improve the dynamic of a room.  While some are purely decorative, there are others that can have a dramatic effect on air and indoor pollution levels.  If you are planning on making a few botanical additions to your home, then why not get the added benefit of choosing plants that will work for you, as well as providing an aesthetic benefit?  Here are a few to get you started. Golden Pothos - This vine-like plant is very easy to grow, requiring very little light, and can survive quite comfortably if you happen to forget to water it on a regular basis.  With regular fertilizing, this plant becomes a fast-growing vine that looks fantastic in any room.  Clippings can be taken, put in water, and will develop root structures in as little as a few days.  Because this is a submersible plant, it is also popular with aquarium enthusiasts.  In addition, this plant is a heavy oxygen producer, and can also remove benzene, formaldehyde, and xylene from your air. Peace Lilies - Interestingly enough, these houseplants are not true lilies. These attractive members of the Araceae family need only a little light and water in order to survive, and produce brilliant flowers. Rubber Tree - While used as houseplants in North America, these plants have an interesting use in India; the roots are guided over chasms in order to create what is commonly referred to as living bridges.  These plants prefer bright sunlight, and while they can withstand infrequent watering quite well, they will thrive if given enough moisture. Weeping Fig - This is the official tree of Bangkok, Thailand.  In a study by NASA, this plant was shown to effectively remove airborne toxins from its environment.  This plant thrives in warm, sunny conditions, but can also tolerate low-light conditions fairly well.  If it is moved to a new room, it will shed a large number of its leaves, and replace them with new leaves in response to the change in light conditions.  While it is adaptive to changes in light, care should be taken not to place it in an area where it will be subjected to strong, cold drafts.  This plant is also popular among bonsai enthusiasts for its aesthetic properties. Snake Plant - Also known as "mother-in-law's tongue", this plant has been recognized in the same NASA study as one of the best plants to remove indoor air pollution.  Like other pollution-reducing plants, this one can survive quite well with low light levels and irregular watering.  Care should be taken not to over water this species, as the root structure is fairly sensitive. For further reading, you can pick up the book How To Grow Fresh Air, by B.C. Wolverton.