Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 10/6/2017

The last thing you want to admit is that your home has become a place of contention. When you recall that amazing day when you first cuddled your newborn child lovingly in your arms, it may startle you that your child and you argue daily now that your child has entered the teen years. Years ago, you swore this day would never come. You and your child’s relationship was going to be different, better than the relationship that you and your parents had.

Confronting the dilemma of growing teens and a shrinking house

The subject matter of your arguments with your teen also surprises you. Somehow the disagreements always swing around to space. There never seems to be enough space at your house anymore.

One of the quickest ways to start a heated disagreement is to cramp your teen’s space. And it’s not that teens need a lot of square footage. Teens demand privacy. It’s their way to gain independence. “Knock before you come into my bedroom;” “Don’t go near my journals” and “Stay out of my space” are common demands that teens make of parents.

Demanding that you steer clear and not encroach on their personal space isn’t the only way that teens can make your house feel far too small. To assert their independence, teens may leave dirty clothes piled in their bedroom.

As a child, they may have obeyed you and cleaned their room every weekend. Now, they treat their bedroom as if they built the room, as if they paid for the room. It’s away to let you know that you’re not calling the shots anymore. Your teen is becoming an adult. Problem is that she is becoming an adult under your roof.

Teens still need your support at home

To push you out, teens might spend hours on social media, watching TV or playing video games, all with their bedroom door closed, another “keep out” message sent to you. Much of this behavior is typical. Teens aren’t only entering adulthood. They are dealing with hormonal changes. They may feel uncertain and afraid, but they may not tell you, especially if they want to stand on their own.

This is a time when your house can feel tiny. You may wish that you had an in-law suite that you could move your teens into just so you don’t feel as if your teens are constantly angry with you. You and your teens will navigate this turbulent terrain, especially if you set clear boundaries when your children were young.

If your teens spend most of their time in their bedroom, check to see that they aren’t simply gazing out the window or lying in bed all day. If they are, consider seeking a professional’s counsel, as your child could be dealing with anxiety or depression.

Give your child space at home without removing yourself from your child’s life. Despite what teens say, they need you. Should you be years away from having teens in your home, make sure that you set clear boundaries. Also, create communication spaces in your home. The kitchen is a good spot. For generations families bonded around the kitchen table, and not just during holidays.

Back porch swings or a den are other places that make for great family bonding areas. On their roughest days, your teens may visit these areas of your home on their own. Pay attention. It could be a signal for you to come and talk with them.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 7/10/2015

You may have noticed that new homes are going up around town again. Along with the sale pending signs on existing homes builders are building again. A national index measuring builder sentiment rose in June to its highest level since May 2007. But is buying a new home right for you? Homebuyers trying to decide between new and existing homes have more choices than they have had in the past. The case for new homes: New homes come with builder warranties. New homes allow buyers to select colors and floor plans. New homes can be easier to insure. Some builders have their own financing divisions, so getting a mortgage from the builder may be easier than from a lender. New homes may have a resale advantage. The case for existing homes: Existing homes may offer more space for the money and a more convenient location. Existing homes can be 10 percent to 20 percent less than new construction for comparable square footage. Existing homes are in established neighborhoods. New homes can take several months or longer to build.      





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 3/20/2015

When you are buying a home the costs really add up and you may start thinking about where you can save money. One question that many buyers ask is do I need a home inspection? Most often the answer to the question is yes! A home inspection is an objective examination of the home and its systems. The inspection covers the entire house from the roof to the foundation. A home inspection will cover the home's foundation, basement, structural components, roof, attic, insulation, walls, ceilings, floors windows and doors. It will also examine the heating system, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical systems. Because a home is often the largest single investment you will ever make it is important to know as much as you can about the home before you buy it. A home inspection will help you identify any needed repairs as well as what is needed to regularly maintain the home. The home inspection will help you proceed with the purchase with confidence. When choosing a home inspector cost shouldn't be your first consideration. Look for the inspector's qualifications, experience, training and compliance with state regulations. Remember, that no house is perfect. There are bound to be issues with almost any home use the information to decide if the house is right for you.

 
 
   





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 2/6/2015

Are you looking for a deal when buying your next home? Buying a fixer-upper home just might be the way to go but there are some important things to know before you buy. These helpful hints can help you save time, money and a lot of headaches when buying a fixer-upper. Set a budget: You need to know how much money you can afford to spend. You will want to factor in the price of the property plus the cost of the renovations. Remember to plan for the unknown, add at least 10% to it for "overruns". Most projects never seem to go as planned. Plan ahead: Buying a fixer-upper requires more planning. When looking at potential homes you will want to make a list of renovations. Try to come up with an estimated cost of the renovations. You will also want to identify whether or not you have the expertise to do the renovations or if you will need to hire a contractor. Get a home inspection: There are some things that are unseen to the untrained eye. A good home inspection will be able to tell you all of the needed repairs and potential pitfalls. Remember buying a fixer-upper is an investment. Follow the tips on this list and you will be prepared for the project of buying, renovating and owning a fixer-upper.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 1/16/2015

You think you live in a palace. Your home is your kingdom but when it comes to selling your home buyers may not be in agreement. In today's market, buyers are pickier than ever and may be literally turning their nose up at your home. Here are a few things that buyers hate about homes: 1. Smells Buyers don't like homes that have a strong smell especially bad smells. Make sure to get rid of any source of odor. The biggest culprits of strong smells are smoking, pets and cooking with strong odors. If you have pets or smoke have the carpets, drapes and all professionally cleaned. If you have a cat make sure the litter box is clean and kept out of the way. You will also need to refrain from cooking things with strong odors. Stay away from strong spices like curry and foods like fish. 2. Dirty bathrooms and kitchens. They say bathrooms and kitchens sell homes, just as easily they can prevent a sale. Concentrate on keeping the bathrooms and kitchen spic and span. Keep the floors vacuumed, the counters clear of clutter, and make sure the sink is free of dirty dishes. Keep freshly cleaned towels available for the showings. 3. Clutter Keep the clutter at bay by investing in some inexpensive wicker baskets. Putting clutter in baskets can be a quick way to pick up toys, store laundry and catch all the mail on the kitchen counter. 4. Poor lighting Who wants to live in the dark? Replace all burnt out bulbs with high efficiency, bright bulbs. Buy some lamps to bring light into poorly lit rooms. Make sure to open all the blinds and pull back the drapes and let as much natural light in as possible. Cleaning the windows will also help show off the light. If you are able turn on all the lights in the home before a potential buyer walks through. 6. Bold colors and wallpaper You may love the bright pink room or the living room clad in wallpaper but chances are a buyer does not share your style. Try to neutralize rooms with creams and off-whites. These colors can also make a room feel larger and brighter. If your home is covered in wallpaper consider removing it. Buyers are often deterred by the thought of having to remove wallpaper. 7. Man's best friends You love Fido the dog and Mittens the cat is just so cute but buyers may have allergies or even be afraid of your pets. Keep the pets away from the home or crated when buyers are looking at your home. 8. You Believe it or not you do not help the sale. The buyer wants to be able to view your home without feeling watched or pressured. If you are in the home or the driveway the buyer will not take the time they need to view the home properly. Leave the selling to the professional.