Cove Real Estate



Posted by Cove Real Estate on 8/28/2015

If you are in the market for a mortgage you will need to know how a lender determines if you are a good candidate for a loan. When you apply for a mortgage or look to refinance your current mortgage there is a mortgage loan underwriter who who has the job of reviewing your loan application and all of the accompanying documents. After you have completed all the paperwork on your end, you may be wondering what exactly is the underwriter looking for? Typically, the underwriter is looking for two things: 1.) your general creditworthiness and 2.) your debt-to-income ratio. How does an underwriter evaluate creditworthiness? Your creditworthiness will give the lender an idea of your willingness to repay your debts. The most common way to determine creditworthiness is to use your credit score. The lender usually uses your FICO (Fair Isaac Corporation) score. Your FICO score is based on an analysis of your various credit files by the three major credit repositories, Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. How does the underwriter determine debt-to-income ratio? The second thing the underwriter wants to determine is how the new mortgage payment will impact your ability to repay. The underwriter will use a calculation called debt-to-income ratio (DTI). When calculating DTI the underwriter compares your monthly gross income (before taxes) and your monthly debts. DTI requirements vary but typically the underwriter is looking to see if the ratio of debt to income— after the cost of your mortgage principal, interest, real estate taxes, insurance and any private mortgage insurance — is less than 40 percent. There are many other factors that go into whether or not you will be able to obtain a mortgage but these are two of the biggest factors.





Posted by Cove Real Estate on 5/9/2014

If you are thinking about buying a new home you are probably hoping to get the best value for your money on a house, but what about your home loan? The rate and terms of your mortgage can have a big impact on your wallet. This is why it is so important to shop for just the right home loan. There are two main factors to consider when shopping for a loan: the type of loan and the terms of the loan. Do your homework before looking at home loans. Even one half of a percentage point makes a big difference over the full term of the loan. A 30 year loan of $200,000 at a 5% fixed-rate, will cost you about $22,000 more in interest than if the interest rate was set at 4.5%. Other things to look at when shopping for a home loan are closing costs. Mortgage companies charge additional fees such as origination fees, title charges, appraisals and even credit checks. Make sure to consider these additional expenses when shopping for a home loan. You can also save money by not maxing out your budget. Just because you are pre-qualified for a loan doesn't mean you should spend the maximum loan amount on a home. Don't allow your total house payment (principal, interest, taxes and insurance) to exceed 28% of your gross monthly income.